Excited about Tapestry 5.1

One of the blogs I am reading on a regular basis is the Tapestry Central blog from Howard Lewis Ship the founder and lead developer of the Tapestry framework. It alreaded provided some really nice ideas and introduced me into some really interesting topics.

So this weekend I read the article about some new Features of the 5.1 Version of the Tapestry framework …

One of the blogs I am reading on a regular basis is the Tapestry Central blog from Howard Lewis Ship the founder and lead developer of the Tapestry framework. It already provided some really nice ideas and introduced me into some really interesting topics.

So this weekend I read the article about some new Features of the 5.1 Version of the Tapestry framework. And I was really exited to read about the plans to reduce/minimize the traffic over the wire. I am studying this topic for quite a while, since I stumbled across it during a project. The trigger was the Best practices article from the Yahoo developer team.

Since then I was using different approaches and tools to improve the performance of the websites of my clients. One very useful tool is JAWR a Javascript and CSS bundling and compression tool. JAWR offers facilities to join multiple Javascript or CSS files in bundles. Each bundle will be delivered compressed (if possible), in addition very strong cache HTTP headers will be set to the HTTP response, so that the internet infrastructure may cache these files. So the traffic the originating server will be reduced. To prevent nasty caching problems the JAWR framework provides facilities to generate URLs to these bundles which contain a version information, so when the bundle changes, a new URL will be generated.

The very exciting thing about the planned Features in Tapestry 5.1 is, that Tapestry is the first content generating web framework which will provide out the box facilities for this kind of issues.
A great weakness of the JSP and JSF approaches to generate content is, that there is no fast/cheap way to determine a last modified date for a page or a component. So the application can’t use the “If-Modified-Since” and “Not Modified” (HTTP status 304) mechanism to provide a lightweight answer for requested resources which have not changed. Maybe Howard Lewis Ship is able to provide this with his Tapestry framework. This would be a great performance boost for any kind of web application.

May very dynamic application don’t address the content delivery issues at all. Its quite sad to see, but on the other hand side it’s good to see that some frameworks are beginning to address this kind of features.

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